Chiudi

Aggiungi l'articolo in

Chiudi
Aggiunto

L’articolo è stato aggiunto alla lista dei desideri

Chiudi

Crea nuova lista

A to Z Growing Roses for Beginners
A to Z Growing Roses for Beginners
Dati e Statistiche
Fuori di libri Post sulla Community Fuori di libri
Wishlist Salvato in 0 liste dei desideri
Scaricabile subito
A to Z Growing Roses for Beginners
Omaggio
Omaggio
Scaricabile subito
Chiudi
Altri venditori
Prezzo e spese di spedizione
ibs
0,00 € Spedizione gratuita
disponibilità immediata disponibilità immediata
Info
Nuovo
Altri venditori
Prezzo e spese di spedizione
ibs
0,00 € Spedizione gratuita
disponibilità immediata disponibilità immediata
Info
Nuovo
Altri venditori
Prezzo e spese di spedizione
Chiudi

Tutti i formati ed edizioni

Chiudi
A to Z Growing Roses for Beginners
Chiudi

Promo attive (0)

Chiudi

Informazioni del regalo

Descrizione


The art of growing roses is an ancient one. Rose plants flourish in many different areas around the world. Perhaps one of the oldest known evidence of the rose was an imprint found in a slate deposit in Florissant, Colorado. The imprint is about 40,000 years old. There are at least 35 species of rose that are native to the United States. Many roses in the U.S., however, had their ancestors arrive with European immigrants. Roses were formally cultivated in Greece as far back as 600 B.C., or perhaps even earlier. Wreaths made from roses have been found in Egyptian tombs. In the middle ages, they were highly prized as part of an herbalist's medical resources, as well as providing both rose petals and rose hips to be made into sweets. These hearty early roses grew out of doors, bloomed in season, and required little coddling. Josephine Bonaparte, wife of Napoleon, kept rose gardens. She had 250 different roses, imported from a variety of places. The tea rose, which for a long time was grown only in greenhouses and shelter gardens, was brought to Europe from China. The first settlers brought roses from Europe; but the native people already planted roses around their villages to make them beautiful. Rose bush starts, carefully wrapped in burlap traveled with farmers seeking fertile ground as they traveled west. Some of them have gone wild, even becoming pests, while native roses – sometimes indistinguishable to the untrained eye, might be caught up in the drive to push back against the thorny plants. Perhaps your vision of a rose is the perfect red bud, just beginning to unfold, that can be presented to a sweetheart. The multipetaled blossom that is so familiar to us is the result of centuries of careful breeding. Horticulturalists have been cross-breeding the "best" stock, grafting, and generally changing the rose for centuries. Modern rose bushes could be divided into three categories: native or wild roses, old garden roses and modern hybrids. The native plants, such as the Missouri wild rose, usually sport simple blossoms, with only a single layer of petals. By way of compensation, these hardy plants can be found in fence rows and in the edges of fields or spreading across neglected fields. Birds eat the nutritious hips and spread the seed far and wide. These beautiful pink roses are nearly indistinguishable from white multiflora roses until the plants bloom. As a result, many of these lovely native plants have probably been eradicated along with the invasive imported plant. There is some reason to restrain or control the growth of roses. Left unchecked, roses that have "gone native" will form nearly impenetrable thickets. Indeed, some were bred to be used as hedges. Some of the older species form dense tangles with thick canes that defy even the toughest clippers and trimmers. Imagine the traditional Sleeping Beauty rose thicket as an example.
Leggi di più Leggi di meno

Dettagli

2017
Testo in en
Tutti i dispositivi (eccetto Kindle) Scopri di più
9781386409441
Chiudi
Aggiunto

L'articolo è stato aggiunto al carrello

Compatibilità

Formato:

Gli eBook venduti da laFeltrinelli.it sono in formato ePub e possono essere protetti da Adobe DRM. In caso di download di un file protetto da DRM si otterrà un file in formato .acs, (Adobe Content Server Message), che dovrà essere aperto tramite Adobe Digital Editions e autorizzato tramite un account Adobe, prima di poter essere letto su pc o trasferito su dispositivi compatibili.

Compatibilità:

Gli eBook venduti da laFeltrinelli.it possono essere letti utilizzando uno qualsiasi dei seguenti dispositivi: PC, eReader, Smartphone, Tablet o con una app Kobo iOS o Android.

Cloud:

Gli eBook venduti da laFeltrinelli.it sono sincronizzati automaticamente su tutti i client di lettura Kobo successivamente all’acquisto. Grazie al Cloud Kobo i progressi di lettura, le note, le evidenziazioni vengono salvati e sincronizzati automaticamente su tutti i dispositivi e le APP di lettura Kobo utilizzati per la lettura.

Clicca qui per sapere come scaricare gli ebook utilizzando un pc con sistema operativo Windows

Chiudi

Aggiungi l'articolo in

Chiudi
Aggiunto

L’articolo è stato aggiunto alla lista dei desideri

Chiudi

Crea nuova lista

Chiudi

Inserisci la tua mail

Chiudi

Chiudi

Siamo spiacenti si è verificato un errore imprevisto, la preghiamo di riprovare.

Chiudi

Verrai avvisato via email sulle novità di Nome Autore